Install and configure snmpd and snmp server on Centos 6.3 or Redhat

Install and configure snmpd and snmp server on Centos 6.3 or Redhat RHEL

1.  Install SNMP Server on Centos 6

[root@localhost /]# yum install net-snmp net-snmp-utils
Loaded plugins: fastestmirror, refresh-packagekit, security
Loading mirror speeds from cached hostfile
* base: centos-hcm.viettelidc.com.vn
* epel: mirror01.idc.hinet.net
* extras: centos-hcm.viettelidc.com.vn
* updates: centos-hcm.viettelidc.com.vn
Setting up Install Process
Resolving Dependencies
–> Running transaction check
—> Package net-snmp.x86_64 1:5.5-41.el6_3.1 will be installed
–> Processing Dependency: net-snmp-libs = 1:5.5-41.el6_3.1 for package: 1:net-snmp-5.5-41.el6_3.1.x86_64
–> Processing Dependency: libnetsnmptrapd.so.20()(64bit) for package: 1:net-snmp-5.5-41.el6_3.1.x86_64
–> Processing Dependency: libnetsnmpmibs.so.20()(64bit) for package: 1:net-snmp-5.5-41.el6_3.1.x86_64
–> Processing Dependency: libnetsnmphelpers.so.20()(64bit) for package: 1:net-snmp-5.5-41.el6_3.1.x86_64
–> Processing Dependency: libnetsnmpagent.so.20()(64bit) for package: 1:net-snmp-5.5-41.el6_3.1.x86_64
–> Processing Dependency: libnetsnmp.so.20()(64bit) for package: 1:net-snmp-5.5-41.el6_3.1.x86_64
—> Package net-snmp-utils.x86_64 1:5.5-41.el6_3.1 will be installed
–> Running transaction check
—> Package net-snmp-libs.x86_64 1:5.5-41.el6_3.1 will be installed
–> Finished Dependency ResolutionDependencies Resolved=====================================================================================================================================================================================================
Package Arch Version Repository Size
=====================================================================================================================================================================================================
Installing:
net-snmp x86_64 1:5.5-41.el6_3.1 updates 302 k
net-snmp-utils x86_64 1:5.5-41.el6_3.1 updates 170 k
Installing for dependencies:
net-snmp-libs x86_64 1:5.5-41.el6_3.1 updates 1.5 MTransaction Summary
=====================================================================================================================================================================================================
Install 3 Package(s)Total download size: 2.0 M
Installed size: 6.6 M
Is this ok [y/N]: y
Downloading Packages:
(1/3): net-snmp-5.5-41.el6_3.1.x86_64.rpm | 302 kB 00:05
(2/3): net-snmp-libs-5.5-41.el6_3.1.x86_64.rpm | 1.5 MB 00:17
(3/3): net-snmp-utils-5.5-41.el6_3.1.x86_64.rpm | 170 kB 00:02
—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–
Total 71 kB/s | 2.0 MB 00:28
Running rpm_check_debug
Running Transaction Test
Transaction Test Succeeded
Running Transaction
Installing : 1:net-snmp-libs-5.5-41.el6_3.1.x86_64 1/3
Installing : 1:net-snmp-utils-5.5-41.el6_3.1.x86_64 2/3
Installing : 1:net-snmp-5.5-41.el6_3.1.x86_64 3/3
Verifying : 1:net-snmp-libs-5.5-41.el6_3.1.x86_64 1/3
Verifying : 1:net-snmp-utils-5.5-41.el6_3.1.x86_64 2/3
Verifying : 1:net-snmp-5.5-41.el6_3.1.x86_64 3/3Installed:
net-snmp.x86_64 1:5.5-41.el6_3.1 net-snmp-utils.x86_64 1:5.5-41.el6_3.1Dependency Installed:
net-snmp-libs.x86_64 1:5.5-41.el6_3.1Complete!
[root@localhost /]#

2. Configure snmpd

[root@localhost /]# vi /etc/snmp/snmpd.conf###############################################################################
#
# snmpd.conf:
# An example configuration file for configuring the ucd-snmp snmpd agent.
#
###############################################################################
#
# This file is intended to only be as a starting point. Many more
# configuration directives exist than are mentioned in this file. For
# full details, see the snmpd.conf(5) manual page.
#
# All lines beginning with a ‘#’ are comments and are intended for you
# to read. All other lines are configuration commands for the agent.###############################################################################
# Access Control
################################################################################ As shipped, the snmpd demon will only respond to queries on the
# system mib group until this file is replaced or modified for
# security purposes. Examples are shown below about how to increase the
# level of access.# By far, the most common question I get about the agent is “why won’t
# it work?”, when really it should be “how do I configure the agent to
# allow me to access it?”
#
# By default, the agent responds to the “public” community for read
# only access, if run out of the box without any configuration file in
# place. The following examples show you other ways of configuring
# the agent so that you can change the community names, and give
# yourself write access to the mib tree as well.
#
# For more information, read the FAQ as well as the snmpd.conf(5)
# manual page.
rocommunity snmp@key 192.168.1.100
rocommunity snmp@key 127.0.0.1
####
# First, map the community name “public” into a “security name”# sec.name source community
com2sec notConfigUser default public####
# Second, map the security name into a group name:# groupName securityModel securityName
group notConfigGroup v1 notConfigUser
group notConfigGroup v2c notConfigUser

####
# Third, create a view for us to let the group have rights to:

# Make at least snmpwalk -v 1 localhost -c public system fast again.
# name incl/excl subtree mask(optional)
view systemview included .1.3.6.1.2.1.1
view systemview included .1.3.6.1.2.1.25.1.1

####
# Finally, grant the group read-only access to the systemview view.

# group context sec.model sec.level prefix read write notif
access notConfigGroup “” any noauth exact systemview none none

# —————————————————————————–

# Here is a commented out example configuration that allows less
# restrictive access.

# YOU SHOULD CHANGE THE “COMMUNITY” TOKEN BELOW TO A NEW KEYWORD ONLY
# KNOWN AT YOUR SITE. YOU *MUST* CHANGE THE NETWORK TOKEN BELOW TO
# SOMETHING REFLECTING YOUR LOCAL NETWORK ADDRESS SPACE.

## sec.name source community
#com2sec local localhost COMMUNITY
#com2sec mynetwork NETWORK/24 COMMUNITY

## group.name sec.model sec.name
#group MyRWGroup any local
#group MyROGroup any mynetwork
#
#group MyRWGroup any otherv3user
#…

## incl/excl subtree mask
#view all included .1 80

## -or just the mib2 tree-

#view mib2 included .iso.org.dod.internet.mgmt.mib-2 fc
## context sec.model sec.level prefix read write notif
#access MyROGroup “” any noauth 0 all none none
#access MyRWGroup “” any noauth 0 all all all
###############################################################################
# Sample configuration to make net-snmpd RFC 1213.
# Unfortunately v1 and v2c don’t allow any user based authentification, so
# opening up the default config is not an option from a security point.
#
# WARNING: If you uncomment the following lines you allow write access to your
# snmpd daemon from any source! To avoid this use different names for your
# community or split out the write access to a different community and
# restrict it to your local network.
# Also remember to comment the syslocation and syscontact parameters later as
# otherwise they are still read only (see FAQ for net-snmp).
#

# First, map the community name “public” into a “security name”
# sec.name source community
#com2sec notConfigUser default public

# Second, map the security name into a group name:
# groupName securityModel securityName
#group notConfigGroup v1 notConfigUser
#group notConfigGroup v2c notConfigUser

# Third, create a view for us to let the group have rights to:
# Open up the whole tree for ro, make the RFC 1213 required ones rw.
# name incl/excl subtree mask(optional)
#view roview included .1
#view rwview included system.sysContact
#view rwview included system.sysName
#view rwview included system.sysLocation
#view rwview included interfaces.ifTable.ifEntry.ifAdminStatus
#view rwview included at.atTable.atEntry.atPhysAddress
#view rwview included at.atTable.atEntry.atNetAddress
#view rwview included ip.ipForwarding
#view rwview included ip.ipDefaultTTL
#view rwview included ip.ipRouteTable.ipRouteEntry.ipRouteDest
#view rwview included ip.ipRouteTable.ipRouteEntry.ipRouteIfIndex
#view rwview included ip.ipRouteTable.ipRouteEntry.ipRouteMetric1
#view rwview included ip.ipRouteTable.ipRouteEntry.ipRouteMetric2
#view rwview included ip.ipRouteTable.ipRouteEntry.ipRouteMetric3
#view rwview included ip.ipRouteTable.ipRouteEntry.ipRouteMetric4
#view rwview included ip.ipRouteTable.ipRouteEntry.ipRouteType
#view rwview included ip.ipRouteTable.ipRouteEntry.ipRouteAge
#view rwview included ip.ipRouteTable.ipRouteEntry.ipRouteMask
#view rwview included ip.ipRouteTable.ipRouteEntry.ipRouteMetric5
#view rwview included ip.ipNetToMediaTable.ipNetToMediaEntry.ipNetToMediaIfIndex
#view rwview included ip.ipNetToMediaTable.ipNetToMediaEntry.ipNetToMediaPhysAddress
#view rwview included ip.ipNetToMediaTable.ipNetToMediaEntry.ipNetToMediaNetAddress
#view rwview included ip.ipNetToMediaTable.ipNetToMediaEntry.ipNetToMediaType
#view rwview included tcp.tcpConnTable.tcpConnEntry.tcpConnState
#view rwview included egp.egpNeighTable.egpNeighEntry.egpNeighEventTrigger
#view rwview included snmp.snmpEnableAuthenTraps

# Finally, grant the group read-only access to the systemview view.
# group context sec.model sec.level prefix read write notif
#access notConfigGroup “” any noauth exact roview rwview none

 

###############################################################################
# System contact information
#

# It is also possible to set the sysContact and sysLocation system
# variables through the snmpd.conf file:

syslocation Unknown (edit /etc/snmp/snmpd.conf)
syscontact Root <root@localhost> (configure /etc/snmp/snmp.local.conf)

# Example output of snmpwalk:
# % snmpwalk -v 1 localhost -c public system
# system.sysDescr.0 = “SunOS name sun4c”
# system.sysObjectID.0 = OID: enterprises.ucdavis.ucdSnmpAgent.sunos4
# system.sysUpTime.0 = Timeticks: (595637548) 68 days, 22:32:55
# system.sysContact.0 = “Me <me@somewhere.org>”
# system.sysName.0 = “name”
# system.sysLocation.0 = “Right here, right now.”
# system.sysServices.0 = 72
###############################################################################
# Logging
#

# We do not want annoying “Connection from UDP: ” messages in syslog.
# If the following option is commented out, snmpd will print each incoming
# connection, which can be useful for debugging.

dontLogTCPWrappersConnects yes

# —————————————————————————–
###############################################################################
# Process checks.
#
# The following are examples of how to use the agent to check for
# processes running on the host. The syntax looks something like:
#
# proc NAME [MAX=0] [MIN=0]
#
# NAME: the name of the process to check for. It must match
# exactly (ie, http will not find httpd processes).
# MAX: the maximum number allowed to be running. Defaults to 0.
# MIN: the minimum number to be running. Defaults to 0.

#
# Examples (commented out by default):
#

# Make sure mountd is running
#proc mountd

# Make sure there are no more than 4 ntalkds running, but 0 is ok too.
#proc ntalkd 4

# Make sure at least one sendmail, but less than or equal to 10 are running.
#proc sendmail 10 1

# A snmpwalk of the process mib tree would look something like this:
#
# % snmpwalk -v 1 localhost -c public .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.2
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prIndex.1 = 1
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prIndex.2 = 2
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prIndex.3 = 3
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prNames.1 = “mountd”
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prNames.2 = “ntalkd”
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prNames.3 = “sendmail”
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prMin.1 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prMin.2 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prMin.3 = 1
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prMax.1 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prMax.2 = 4
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prMax.3 = 10
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prCount.1 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prCount.2 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prCount.3 = 1
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrorFlag.1 = 1
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrorFlag.2 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrorFlag.3 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrMessage.1 = “No mountd process running.”
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrMessage.2 = “”
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrMessage.3 = “”
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrFix.1 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrFix.2 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.procTable.prEntry.prErrFix.3 = 0
#
# Note that the errorFlag for mountd is set to 1 because one is not
# running (in this case an rpc.mountd is, but thats not good enough),
# and the ErrMessage tells you what’s wrong. The configuration
# imposed in the snmpd.conf file is also shown.
#
# Special Case: When the min and max numbers are both 0, it assumes
# you want a max of infinity and a min of 1.
#
# —————————————————————————–
###############################################################################
# Executables/scripts
#

#
# You can also have programs run by the agent that return a single
# line of output and an exit code. Here are two examples.
#
# exec NAME PROGRAM [ARGS …]
#
# NAME: A generic name. The name must be unique for each exec statement.
# PROGRAM: The program to run. Include the path!
# ARGS: optional arguments to be passed to the program

# a simple hello world

#exec echotest /bin/echo hello world

# Run a shell script containing:
#
# #!/bin/sh
# echo hello world
# echo hi there
# exit 35
#
# Note: this has been specifically commented out to prevent
# accidental security holes due to someone else on your system writing
# a /tmp/shtest before you do. Uncomment to use it.
#
#exec shelltest /bin/sh /tmp/shtest

# Then,
# % snmpwalk -v 1 localhost -c public .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.8
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extIndex.1 = 1
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extIndex.2 = 2
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extNames.1 = “echotest”
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extNames.2 = “shelltest”
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extCommand.1 = “/bin/echo hello world”
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extCommand.2 = “/bin/sh /tmp/shtest”
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extResult.1 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extResult.2 = 35
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extOutput.1 = “hello world.”
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extOutput.2 = “hello world.”
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extErrFix.1 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.extTable.extEntry.extErrFix.2 = 0

# Note that the second line of the /tmp/shtest shell script is cut
# off. Also note that the exit status of 35 was returned.

# —————————————————————————–
###############################################################################
# disk checks
#

# The agent can check the amount of available disk space, and make
# sure it is above a set limit.

# disk PATH [MIN=100000]
#
# PATH: mount path to the disk in question.
# MIN: Disks with space below this value will have the Mib’s errorFlag set.
# Default value = 100000.

# Check the / partition and make sure it contains at least 10 megs.

#disk / 10000

# % snmpwalk -v 1 localhost -c public .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.9
# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskIndex.1 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskPath.1 = “/” Hex: 2F
# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskDevice.1 = “/dev/dsk/c201d6s0”
# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskMinimum.1 = 10000
# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskTotal.1 = 837130
# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskAvail.1 = 316325
# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskUsed.1 = 437092
# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskPercent.1 = 58
# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskErrorFlag.1 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.diskTable.dskEntry.diskErrorMsg.1 = “”

# —————————————————————————–
###############################################################################
# load average checks
#

# load [1MAX=12.0] [5MAX=12.0] [15MAX=12.0]
#
# 1MAX: If the 1 minute load average is above this limit at query
# time, the errorFlag will be set.
# 5MAX: Similar, but for 5 min average.
# 15MAX: Similar, but for 15 min average.

# Check for loads:
#load 12 14 14

# % snmpwalk -v 1 localhost -c public .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.10
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveIndex.1 = 1
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveIndex.2 = 2
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveIndex.3 = 3
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveNames.1 = “Load-1”
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveNames.2 = “Load-5”
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveNames.3 = “Load-15”
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveLoad.1 = “0.49” Hex: 30 2E 34 39
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveLoad.2 = “0.31” Hex: 30 2E 33 31
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveLoad.3 = “0.26” Hex: 30 2E 32 36
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveConfig.1 = “12.00”
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveConfig.2 = “14.00”
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveConfig.3 = “14.00”
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveErrorFlag.1 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveErrorFlag.2 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveErrorFlag.3 = 0
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveErrMessage.1 = “”
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveErrMessage.2 = “”
# enterprises.ucdavis.loadTable.laEntry.loadaveErrMessage.3 = “”

# —————————————————————————–
###############################################################################
# Extensible sections.
#

# This alleviates the multiple line output problem found in the
# previous executable mib by placing each mib in its own mib table:

# Run a shell script containing:
#
# #!/bin/sh
# echo hello world
# echo hi there
# exit 35
#
# Note: this has been specifically commented out to prevent
# accidental security holes due to someone else on your system writing
# a /tmp/shtest before you do. Uncomment to use it.
#
# exec .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.50 shelltest /bin/sh /tmp/shtest

# % snmpwalk -v 1 localhost -c public .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.50
# enterprises.ucdavis.50.1.1 = 1
# enterprises.ucdavis.50.2.1 = “shelltest”
# enterprises.ucdavis.50.3.1 = “/bin/sh /tmp/shtest”
# enterprises.ucdavis.50.100.1 = 35
# enterprises.ucdavis.50.101.1 = “hello world.”
# enterprises.ucdavis.50.101.2 = “hi there.”
# enterprises.ucdavis.50.102.1 = 0

# Now the Output has grown to two lines, and we can see the ‘hi
# there.’ output as the second line from our shell script.
#
# Note that you must alter the mib.txt file to be correct if you want
# the .50.* outputs above to change to reasonable text descriptions.

# Other ideas:
#
# exec .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.51 ps /bin/ps
# exec .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.52 top /usr/local/bin/top
# exec .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.53 mailq /usr/bin/mailq

# —————————————————————————–
###############################################################################
# Pass through control.
#

# Usage:
# pass MIBOID EXEC-COMMAND
#
# This will pass total control of the mib underneath the MIBOID
# portion of the mib to the EXEC-COMMAND.
#
# Note: You’ll have to change the path of the passtest script to your
# source directory or install it in the given location.
#
# Example: (see the script for details)
# (commented out here since it requires that you place the
# script in the right location. (its not installed by default))

# pass .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.255 /bin/sh /usr/local/local/passtest

# % snmpwalk -v 1 localhost -c public .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.255
# enterprises.ucdavis.255.1 = “life the universe and everything”
# enterprises.ucdavis.255.2.1 = 42
# enterprises.ucdavis.255.2.2 = OID: 42.42.42
# enterprises.ucdavis.255.3 = Timeticks: (363136200) 42 days, 0:42:42
# enterprises.ucdavis.255.4 = IpAddress: 127.0.0.1
# enterprises.ucdavis.255.5 = 42
# enterprises.ucdavis.255.6 = Gauge: 42
#
# % snmpget -v 1 localhost public .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.255.5
# enterprises.ucdavis.255.5 = 42
#
# % snmpset -v 1 localhost public .1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.255.1 s “New string”
# enterprises.ucdavis.255.1 = “New string”
#

# For specific usage information, see the man/snmpd.conf.5 manual page
# as well as the local/passtest script used in the above example.

###############################################################################
# Further Information
#
# See the snmpd.conf manual page, and the output of “snmpd -H”.

3.  Start snmpd on Centos Server

[root@localhost /]# /etc/init.d/snmpd restart
Stopping snmpd: [FAILED]
Starting snmpd: [ OK ]
[root@localhost /]#

4. Test snmp service on our Server

[root@localhost /]# snmpwalk -v 1 -c snmp@key -O e 127.0.0.1

That’s all. Thanks for using IThelpblog.com.

 

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